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Fifth and Sixth Grade Math Games For Parents

Fifth and Sixth Grade Math Games For Parents

Bonnie Adama has created a rich resource of 112 games proven in the classroom to help both fifth and sixth graders learn basic math skills. With these skills, your child will be well on their way to success in 5th and 6th grade math.

The games cover these important areas in 5th and 6th grade math:

• Addition, Place Value, and Rounding
• Subtraction
• Multiplication
• Division
• Multiple Operations
• Decimals
• Integers
• Fractions
• Money
• Coordinates

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Here is a sample game that I have found very effective when working with fifth and sixth graders:

Decimals are a challenge for fifth and sixth graders. “Do Your Decimals” is one of several games which help students practice adding decimals.

Do Your Decimals

What you need:
– 2 players
– deck of cards, 10’s removed
– 1 die
– paper, pencil

Shuffle cards and place them face down in a pile.

Players draw three cards and make a three-digit number.

Even numbers are whole numbers.
Odd numbers are decimals.

Example: Player #1 draws a 7, 4, and 9. He writes it on his paper as 4.79 or 4.97

Players draw three more cards and arrange them as they did their first set (even numbers are whole numbers, odd numbers are decimals.)

Example: Player #1 draws three more cards and gets 6, 2, and 5. He writes it as 62.5 or 26.5

Players add their two numbers together.

Example: Player #1

4.97
+62.5
67.47

Both players turn over three new cards per turn after the first round and both continue to add these three new cards to their last score.

The winner is the player who is closest to 500 or 1000 without exceeding it.

Fourth Grade Math Games For Parents

Fourth Grade Math Games For Parents

Bonnie Adama has created a rich resource of 120 games proven in the classroom to help your fourth grader learn basic math skills. With these skills, your child will be well on their way to success in 4th grade math.

The games cover these important areas in 4th grade math:

• Addition, Place Value, and Rounding
• Subtraction
• Multiplication
• Division
• Multiple Operations
• Integers
• Fractions
• Decimals
• Money
• Coordinates

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Here is a sample game that I have found very effective when working with fourth graders:

Fourth graders have a lot of things they need to practice and perfect. Double-digit multiplication is one of them. “Get to 10” is a great game for helping to achieve that goal.

Get to 10!

What you need:
– 2 players
– deck of cards, 10’s removed
– paper, pencil

Shuffle cards and place face down in a pile.

Each player takes four cards, moves them around, and arranges them to make a two-digit multiplication problem. The object is to make the largest product possible.

GetTo10

Players write out their problems and check each other’s answers. The player with the highest product wins 1 point. The first player to score 10 points is the winner.

Variation: Make the smallest product to win.

Use calculators to check answers.

Third Grade Math Games For Parents

Third Grade Math Games For Parents

Bonnie Adama has created a rich resource of 147 games proven in the classroom to help your third grader learn basic math skills. With these skills, your child will be well on their way to success in 3rd grade math.

The games cover these important areas in 3rd grade math:

• Simple Addition
• Place Value, Addition, and Rounding to 100
• Place Value, Addition, and Rounding to 1,000
• Subtraction
• Multiplication
• Division
• Multiple Operations
• Fractions
• Money

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Here is a sample game that I have found very effective when working with third graders:

If it’s third grade, it means multiplication! One of my favorite multiplication games is Multiplication Fact Feud. It’s a great way target and practice certain facts.

Multiplication Fact Feud

What you need:
– 2 players
– deck of cards

Teacher or parent decides the particular multiplication fact to practice (i.e. x7, x4, x8, etc.) Once the constant factor is determined, that card is placed between the two players. Players then divide the remaining cards evenly between themselves.

Each player turns over one card and multiplies that card by the constant in the middle. Players must verbalize their math sentence. The player with the highest product collects both cards.

Example:

MultiplicationFactFeud

In the event of a tie (i.e. both players have the same product), each player turns over one more card and multiplies that by the constant factor. The player with the highest product wins all four cards.

When the cards are all used up, the player with the most cards wins the game.

Second Grade Math Games for Parents

Second Grade Math Games for Parents

Bonnie Adama has created a rich resource of 161 games proven to help your second grader learn basic math skills. With these skills, your child will be well on their way to success in 2nd grade math.

The games cover these important areas in 2nd grade math:

• Number Recognition and Counting
• Greater Than/Less Than, More or Less
• Addition to 10
• Addition to 30
• Place Value, Addition, and Rounding to 100
• Place Value, Addition, and Rounding to 1,000
• Subtraction
• Multiplication
• Division
• Multiple Operations
• Money
• Time
• Fractions
• Shapes

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Here is a sample game that I have found very effective when working with second graders:

Get Close to 100 is a great game for second graders. It helps children practice double-digit addition with special emphasis on understanding place value.

Get Close to 100

What you need:
– 2 – 4 players
– deck of cards, 10s removed
– Get “Close to 100” recording sheets (below) for each player

The object of the game is to make a two-digit addition problem that comes as close to 100 as possible.

Shuffle cards and place them face down in a pile.

Player #1 turns over 4 cards and moves the cards around until he/she has created a two-digit addition problem whose sum will be as close to 100 as he/she can make it. You can go over 100. Player #1 records this problem on his/her recording sheet. Player #2 checks for addition accuracy.

Example: Player #1 draws a 4, a 7, a 2, and a 5. He/she moves the cards around until she/he decides that:

47 + 52 = 99 is the closest that he/she can get.

Player # 2 draws four cards and does the same.

The points for each round are the difference between their sum and 100.

Example: A sum of 95 scores 5 points and so does a sum of 105.

Players compare scores at the end of this first round. They put their four cards in a discard pile and player #2 begins first and turns over four more cards for the second round.

After six rounds, players total their points and the player with the lowest score wins.

CloseTo100

Download the Close to 100 scoresheet as a Word document

Download the Close to 100 scoresheet as a pdf

First Grade Math Games for Parents

First Grade Math Games for Parents

Bonnie Adama has created a rich resource of 130 games proven to help your first grader learn basic math skills. With these skills, your child will be well on their way to success in 1st grade math.

The games cover these important areas in 1st grade math:

• Number Recognition
• Counting
• Greater Than/Less Than, More or Less
• Addition to 10
• Addition to 30
• Place Value, Addition, and Rounding to 100
• Place Value, Addition, and Rounding to 1,000
• Subtraction
• Multiple Operations – Addition and Subtraction
• Odd/Even
• Money
• Time
• Fractions
• Shapes

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Here is a sample game that I have found very effective when working with first graders:

Same Sums is a perfect game for First Graders. It allows everyone to practice those addition facts to 10 that are so important. Children need to have them in long term memory as soon as possible.

Same Sums also helps children understand the meaning of the = (equal) sign. Many people think it just means “now find the answer”. Children need to understand that the equation must be equal (balanced) on both sides of the = sign.

Same Sums

What you need:
– 2 players
– Same Sums cards (below) copied and cut out

Turn all the cards face down in 6 rows of 4 cards each.

Player #1 turns over two cards. If the sums match, player #1 keeps both cards. If the sums do not match, he/she turns the two cards back over.

Player # 2 does the same.

Play continues until all the cards are matched. The person with the most cards wins the game.

Same Sums cards (copy and cut out):

samesumcards

Kindergarten Math Games for Parents

Kindergarten Math Games for Parents

Bonnie Adama has created a rich resource of 73 games proven in the classroom to help your kindergartener learn basic math skills. With these skills, your child will be well on their way to success in elementary school math.

The games cover these important areas in Kindergarten math:

• Number Recognition
• Counting
• Greater Than/Less Than, More or Less
• Odd/Even
• Addition to 10
• Addition to 20
• Subtraction
• Addition and Subtraction
• Money
• Time
• Shapes
• Fractions

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Here is a sample game that I have found very effective when working with kindergarteners:

Cover Up! – A Perfect Game for Kindergarteners
Kindergarteners will work on number recognition from 1-6 in this game. When they have mastered this, try the variation which involves number recognition to 12 and simple addition.

Cover Up!

What you need:
– 2 players
– 1 die
– paper and pencils
– number line (following) for each player
– 6 counters (unifix cubes, tiles, beans, pennies, etc.) for each player

The winner of Cross Out is the first person to put a marker on all six numbers.

Players take turns rolling the die and putting a marker on the corresponding number on his/her number line. If a number already has a marker on it, that player loses his/her turn.

Variation: Roll two dice and add them together. Each child will need the 2-12 number line.

This game seems simple, but it really helps young children recognize the dots on the dice. When they begin, they may need to count the dots each time, but soon they ought to learn what number the dots represent without counting them.

Cross Out 1-6 Number Line (Copy on card stock, laminate, and cut out)

2-6

Cross Out 2-12 Number Line (Copy on card stock, laminate, and cut out)

2-12